Monday Forums in SOAS China Institute on Monday, 27 February, 5pm-7pm: Why are the Chinese media Chinese? Prof. Hugo de Burgh (University of Westminster)

Why are the Chinese media Chinese?

Prof. Hugo de Burgh (University of Westminster)

Date: 27 February 2017 Time: 5:00 PM

Finishes: 27 February 2017Time: 7:00 PM

Venue: Russell Square: College Buildings Room: G3

Type of Event: Forum

Registration: Free, but registration essential to guarantee a place

Hugo de Burgh

Abstract

Until recently media academics have tended to look at the Chinese media and in particular Chinese journalism as deviations from the norm, or as having, on account of political pressure, failed to have modernised. Underpinning this is a theory that ‘modernisation’ is a common process through which all societies go, sooner or later, and that the most advanced societies are the Anglophone.The assumption has also been made that identical technology and similar organisation work to homogenise media.Nevertheless, recently there has been a move towards trying to understand the media of specific countries as reflexions of culture and products of their own history. Simultaneously, format producers work hard to localise formats created elsewhere. If we apply this approach to China, the most useful explanatory tools are provided by anthropology and history. Political economy can only unearth part of the story. In this talk, I will attempt to show how, if we look at the Chinese media differently, we can explain better how they are distinct from those of the Anglosphere, as indeed are those of the Mediterranean, and probably other areas of the world. The Chinese media, like the Anglophone, have both strengths and weaknesses. The political systems to which they are attached influence them but they are also reflexions of cultures which have also conditioned the political systems.There are, in other words, no such things as global media. The Anglophone media are Anglophone. Chinese, Chinese.

Biography

Hugo de Burgh is the director of the China Media Centre and Professor of Journalism in the Communications and Media Research Institute of the University of Westminster. A pioneer of the study of the Chinese media in Europe, he worked for 15 years in British TV and is an authority on investigative journalism. His books and articles on China and its media have been published widely. He is writer presenter of The West You Don’t Know, a 7-part documentary series which is the first commission by CCTV of foreign-made programmes and was transmitted over Chinese New Year 2013. He is the author or editor of 8 books; writer on investigative journalism now specialising in Chinese affairs, his China’s Media will be published by Polity USA in 2017. Earlier books include The West You Really Don’t Know (in Chinese, 2013), China’s Environment and China’s Environment Journalists (2012) and Investigative Journalism (2ndEdition, 2008). He is Professor at Tsinghua University, and SAFEA (National Administration for International Expertise) Endowment Professor for 2014-6.

Organiser: SOAS China Institute

Contact email: sci@soas.ac.uk

Contact Tel: +44 (0)20 7898 4823

Terzo Incontro 2016 – Asian Community in Europe “Xi Jingping in perspective and what it means for Asia” Prof. Hugo de Burgh, University of Westminster

Secondo ciclo di conferenze nell’ambito del Progetto Asian Community in Europe con il supporto della One Asia Foundation per la formazione di una futura comunità di studiosi sull ‘Asia, in collaborazione con il Dipartimento Istituto Italiano di Studi orientali – ISO

Terzo Incontro 2016 – Asian Community in Europe

Università degli Studi di Roma “Sapienza”

 

“Xi Jingping in perspective and what it means for Asia”

 

Prof. Hugo de Burgh

University of Westminster

 

Professore di giornalismo all’Università di Westminster e Direttore del China Media Centre da lui fondato presso la stessa Università. Precursore degli studi in Europa sul sistema della comunicazione mediatica in Cina, ha effettuato ricerche soprattutto sul giornalismo investigativo, focalizzandosi sull’impatto che ha avuto sui media e sul governo della RPC la trattazione di alcune tematiche particolarmente sensibili, come quella ambientale. Ha ricoperto incarichi accademici presso l’Università Qinghua di Pechino, quella Fudan di Shanghai, e la Scuola Internazionale di Giornalismo di Xinan. le sue recenti pubblicazioni includono : China’s media (2016), The west you really don’t know (2013), China’s environment (2012), China’s environment journalists and investigative journalism (2008). 

 

MARTEDI 22 NOVEMBRE ALLE 14:00

DIPARTIMENTO ISTITUTO ITALIANO DI STUDI ORIENTALI – ISO

AULA 107 Nuova sede

Scalo San Loreanzo RM21 – Circonvallazione Tiburtina 4, Roma

 

Organizzato dalla Prof.ssa Marina Miranda e Dott.ssa Giuseppina De Nicola

Contatti: Dott.ssa Giuseppina De Nicola

Email: giuseppina.denicola@uniroma1.it

 

 

CMC’s briefing on UK policy development and communication for senior Chinese political editors

China Media Centre organised a briefing on UK policy development and communication for a group of senior Chinese political editors in May 2015.

Delegation visited the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS), where they met lord Saatchi.
Delegation visited the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS), where they met lord Saatchi.

The Editors, whose number included the Editor of the journal of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Qiushi, visited the UK in order to engage the policy worlds of the English speaking countries in debate on economic, social and constitutional ideas. They were also here to learn how they can promote discussion and contributions to policy-making in China.

Mr Zhu Tiezhi, Qiushi Deputy Editor-in-chief, Lord Saatchi and Mr Tim Knox at the CPS.
Mr Zhu Tiezhi, Qiushi Deputy Editor-in-chief, Lord Saatchi and Mr Tim Knox at the CPS.

Among others, they met Lord Saatchi, Lord Heseltine, the editors of Prospect and The Spectator. They visited think tanks such as the IEA and heard lectures from leading political scientists who specialise in policy generation and communication.

Mr Zhu Tiezhi presented Chinese tea to Lord Heseltine after his talk to the delegation.
Mr Zhu Tiezhi presented Chinese tea to Lord Heseltine after his talk to the delegation.

 

 

CMC Case Study: MENTORING THE CREATIVE PROCESS FOR CHINESE TV

Shanghai Media Group, a leading Chinese communications corporation, sent a delegation of 15 young TV producers and directors to us to learn more about the creative process. Under our guidance they developed four potential programme formats. One proved to be a big weekend entertainment hit, generating enormous advertising revenue for SMG.

The challenge

SMG photoIn the past, programme development in China was haphazard: there was no system, no structure and no established process to develop an idea into a programme, much less maximise the success of a new format. Shanghai Media Group (SMG) had heard about UK producers and understood that development – turning an idea into a format – was an established practice in the UK. SMG wanted to learn the techniques to control and shape an idea to highlight its strengths, eliminate flaws and maximise the creativity of the team developing the idea.

They tasked the China Media Centre (CMC) with creating a mentoring course that offered both a strategic outlook and practical production techniques, but above all one that taught the members how to develop successful ideas. Read more