China Media Centre 2016 Winter Seminar – Prof Qian Yufang, Zhejiang University of Media and Communications, China

seminarTHE APPLICATION OF CORPORA IN MEDIA DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

Speaker: Prof Qian Yufang

Research Centre for Discourse and Communications,

Zhejiang University of Media and Communications, China

Date: Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Time: 14:00 – 16:00

Venue: RS 501, 309 Regent Street W1B 2HW

Chair: Professor Chang Xiangqun

OPEN TO ALL

Abstract: The past few decades have seen corpus linguistics emerging as a new and dynamic social research method. Text corpora provide large databases of naturally-occurring discourse, enabling empirical analysis of the actual patterns of language use; and, when coupled with (semi-)automatic computational tools, the corpus-based approach enables analysis of a scope not otherwise feasible. Examples of real life language use are collected, in order to support or negate the researcher’s hypothesis. Corpus access software can not only demonstrate the nonobvious in a single text, but expose ‘hidden thoughts’ beyond the researcher’s expectation. Corpus investigation is useful for critical linguists, because the observed frequent repetitions help the researchers to identify and make explicit descriptions of texts. Corpora can play an extremely important role in critical social research, allowing researchers to identify objectively widespread patterns of naturally occurring language and rare but telling examples, both of which may be overlooked in a small-scale analysis.

Key words: corpora, media discourse, research method, corpus analytical tools

Biography: Qian Yufang, Professor and Head of the Research Centre for Discourse and Communications, Zhejiang University of Media and Communications, China. Her research interests include discourse studies, discourse communication and corpus linguistics. Her book Discursive constructions around terrorism in the People’s Daily and The Sun before and after 9.11, Oxford Peter Lang, won the National Prize for Outstanding Achievement of Social Science, which is the top governmental prize for social science in China. She has published series of journal articles on corpus-based media discourse analysis. She has completed two Ministry of Education Social Science Projects. She is currently directing one China National Social Science Foundation Project. In 2013, she was appointed as an expert of appraisal for National Social Science Project; in the same year, she was appointed as the member of Teaching Guiding Committee for College Foreign Language Majors under the Zhejiang Provincial Department of Education. In 2014, she was awarded as Provincial Excellent Teacher by Zhejiang Provincial Government.

If you have any inquiry about CMC events, please contact Alja Kranjec at: A.Kranjec@westminster.ac.uk

China Media Centre Spring 2016 Seminar: Prof Michel Hockx (SOAS, University of London)

Speaker: Prof Michel Hockx (SOAS, University of London)
Date: Wednesday, 24 February 2016
Time: 14:00 – 16:00 (with refreshments to follow)
Venue: A6.03
Chair: Dr David Feng

OPEN TO ALL

This paper surveys the development of online creative writing in Mainland China in the past fifteen years. It demonstrates how online communities are bringing about unprecedented changes in the structure of the Chinese literary field, both through literary and aesthetic innovations and through challenges to the established system of publishing. Both high-end and low-end forms of literary production are taken into account. The Chinese phenomena are discussed against the background of recent debates in western scholarship about the concept of “world literature,” which so far have largely excluded online texts.

Bio:

Michel Hockx (b. 1964) is Professor of Chinese at SOAS, University of London, and founding director of the SOAS China Institute. He studied Chinese language and literature at Leiden University in The Netherlands, and at Liaoning and Beijing Universities in China. His research focuses on modern and contemporary Chinese literary communities, their publications, their values, and their interaction with state regulators. He has also published on modern Chinese poetry. His most recent monograph, Internet Literature in China, came out with Columbia University Press in 2015.

If you have any inquiry about CMC events, please contact Alja Kranjec at:
A.Kranjec@westminster.ac.uk

Upcoming Seminar: Vincent Ni from the BBC to Speak on 02 December 2015

The China Media Centre has the pleasure to announce its first seminar for academic year 2015-2016.

This event is open to all members of the public, but it is recommended that all register for the event.

China Media Centre 2015 Winter Seminar
“JUST WRITE WHAT YOU’VE SEEN”:
 THE BBC AND ITS CHINA COVERAGE
Speaker: Mr Vincent Ni
Date: Wednesday, 02 December 2015
Time: 14:00 – 16:00 (with refreshments to follow)
Venue: A6.07
Chair: Dr David Feng

OPEN TO ALL

The BBC is widely known as a major player in the world media, offering also services in Chinese. Its in-depth reporting and a “just write what you’ve seen” commitment to coverage means it includes content and people that the official Beijing news sources tend to shy away from. There remains an equal amount of misunderstanding, conflict, and news coverage gap between the BBC and China-based official media. He is here to discuss these issues further, to share first-hand experience, and also give advice to students seeking to enter the world of journalism.

Vincent Weifeng Ni is a senior producer at the BBC World Service, who has just recently covered the historic election in Myanmar. He appears on BBC Chinese, World Service radio, and BBC World TV, and is now also a fellow at the RSA. Until 2014, he was a foreign correspondent for Caixin Media. At Caixin, he served as its correspondent in Washington, DC, New York, Cairo, and London. Ni covered the 2012 US general election and extensively reported on the debt crises in Europe from London, Berlin, and France. During the Arab Spring in Egypt in 2011, he was one of the very few Chinese journalists reporting from Cairo’s Tahrir Square. In November 2011, with a colleague Ni won a runner-up place in the London Foreign Press Association’s annual awards in the category Financial / Economic Story of the Year. He holds a Master’s degree from the University of Oxford, where he was the recipient of the Hoare Family / China-Oxford Scholarship in the field of Social Science. He was also the China Fellow at Columbia Journalism School in 2012-13.

China Media Centre 2015 Winter Seminar–18 March 2015 2pm – 4pm@A6.09

China Media Centre 2015 Winter Seminar
THE RISE OF CHINESE SOFT POWER

UntitledSpeaker: Zhang He, correspondent, China Central Television, London
Date: Wednesday 18th March 2015
Time: 2pm – 4pm
Venue: A6.09, Harrow Campus
Chair: Professor Hugo de Burgh

 

OPEN TO ALL

Zhang He joined CCTV in 2012 and was posted to Britain to prepare the way for the expansion of CCTV’s operation in Europe. In this seminar, he will reflect on China’s rising media influence and public diplomacy, the difference between Chinese and western media, and the new challenges posed by the information age.
Zhang He studied at the China Foreign Affairs University, which is affiliated to China’s Foreign Ministry. After graduation, he worked for the English Service at China Radio International, covering stories across China such as the Sichuan earthquakes, the Shanghai Expo and the Guangzhou Asian Games. He spent a month travelling across Pakistan from Karachi to the Karakoram Highway and filed a series of reports on China’s influence overseas. Since arriving in London, Zhang He has travelled to fifteen European countries and covered major international stories in Chinese and English for CCTV.

If you have any inquiry about CMC events, please contact Alja Kranjec at A.Kranjec@westminster.ac.uk