CMC’s briefing on UK policy development and communication for senior Chinese political editors

China Media Centre organised a briefing on UK policy development and communication for a group of senior Chinese political editors in May 2015.

Delegation visited the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS), where they met lord Saatchi.

Delegation visited the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS), where they met lord Saatchi.

The Editors, whose number included the Editor of the journal of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China, Qiushi, visited the UK in order to engage the policy worlds of the English speaking countries in debate on economic, social and constitutional ideas. They were also here to learn how they can promote discussion and contributions to policy-making in China.

Mr Zhu Tiezhi, Qiushi Deputy Editor-in-chief, Lord Saatchi and Mr Tim Knox at the CPS.

Mr Zhu Tiezhi, Qiushi Deputy Editor-in-chief, Lord Saatchi and Mr Tim Knox at the CPS.

Among others, they met Lord Saatchi, Lord Heseltine, the editors of Prospect and The Spectator. They visited think tanks such as the IEA and heard lectures from leading political scientists who specialise in policy generation and communication.

Mr Zhu Tiezhi presented Chinese tea to Lord Heseltine after his talk to the delegation.

Mr Zhu Tiezhi presented Chinese tea to Lord Heseltine after his talk to the delegation.

 

 

China Media Centre 2015 Winter Seminar–18 March 2015 2pm – 4pm@A6.09

China Media Centre 2015 Winter Seminar
THE RISE OF CHINESE SOFT POWER

UntitledSpeaker: Zhang He, correspondent, China Central Television, London
Date: Wednesday 18th March 2015
Time: 2pm – 4pm
Venue: A6.09, Harrow Campus
Chair: Professor Hugo de Burgh

 

OPEN TO ALL

Zhang He joined CCTV in 2012 and was posted to Britain to prepare the way for the expansion of CCTV’s operation in Europe. In this seminar, he will reflect on China’s rising media influence and public diplomacy, the difference between Chinese and western media, and the new challenges posed by the information age.
Zhang He studied at the China Foreign Affairs University, which is affiliated to China’s Foreign Ministry. After graduation, he worked for the English Service at China Radio International, covering stories across China such as the Sichuan earthquakes, the Shanghai Expo and the Guangzhou Asian Games. He spent a month travelling across Pakistan from Karachi to the Karakoram Highway and filed a series of reports on China’s influence overseas. Since arriving in London, Zhang He has travelled to fifteen European countries and covered major international stories in Chinese and English for CCTV.

If you have any inquiry about CMC events, please contact Alja Kranjec at A.Kranjec@westminster.ac.uk

Trends of the Chinese Internet of Tomorrow

David Feng (Bio, All Articles)

Just earlier this month, CNNIC (the China Network Information Centre) came out with its 35th report about the Chinese Internet. Done twice every year, it reported that China has (still!) yet to reach the point at which over half the population was online. It also reported a few others ups and downs, although even here with the slower-than-expected growth, the Chinese Internet of tomorrow still remains an interesting place to keep one’s eye out for.

Internet access

Even a mere skim of the report reveals fascinating insights about how the Internet of China might develop. Here are some of the more interesting findings:

Read more

WeChat: Shaking China…

David Feng(Bio, All Articles)

Happy Year of the Sheep!

Some of us might remember what the shake does in Google Maps — we had quite a few that “shook” the phone with the app running by mistake — and were asked to provide feedback at a time when we were more likely shaking the app for having led us into a cul-de-sac! (Obviously, the timing wasn’t quite right!)

The shaking continued, as of late, but in a different part of the world…

Shake WeChat

Read more